Who do you most want in Boris Johnson’s new Cabinet? – Vote in Express.co.uk poll

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BORIS JOHNSON announced he will give the UK the “leadership it deserves” in his first speech as Prime Minister this afternoon. But who do you want most in Boris Johnson’s new Cabinet? Vote in Express.co.uk’s poll.

A number of Remainer Cabinet ministers quit the Government this afternoon as Mr Johnson was welcomed into his new role by the Queen. Chancellor Philip Hammond honoured his weekend promise to walk out rather than be part of an administration committed to a no deal Brexit.  He was followed by Justice Secretary David Gauke and International Aid Secretary Rory Stewart, who had both said they would resign before being sacked by Mr Johnson. 

In his letter, published on Twitter, Mr Hammond said Mrs May’s successor must “be free to choose a Chancellor who is fully aligned with his policy position”.

He said: ‘We bequeath to our successors genuine choices, once a Brexit deal is done: The ability to choose, within fiscal rules, between increased public spending, reduced taxes, higher investment or progress towards faster debt reduction – or some combination of all four.

“After a decade when the aftermath of the 2008-09 recession meant we had no choices, this is a luxury which our successors should use wisely.”

The latest people to leave this afternoon include Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt who said she is “heading to the backbenches from where the PM will have my full support as will my successors”.

International Trade Secretary Liam Fox has also left, as well as MP for Tunbridge Wells Greg Clark.

Positions in Mr Johnson’s Cabinet are now being announced, with the top positions in Mr Johnson’s cabinet likely to go to those who have given their support throughout his leadership campaign.

But who do you want most in Mr Johnson’s new Cabinet and do you agree with his choices?

Tory MP Priti Patel has been appointed Home Secretary and tweeted earlier today: “First class – a vision for our Country, optimism about our future and the great opportunities that lie ahead for global Britain.”

Ms Patel was a leading player in the leadership campaign and may return to government after she was forced by Mrs May to resign as international development secretary over unauthorised contacts with Israeli officials.

During a leadership debate last week Mr Johnson pledged to appoint at least one woman to one of the so-called “great offices of state”: the Treasury, Foreign Office and Home Office.

The Environment Secretary came third in the Tory leadership race but has still shown his backing for Mr Johnson.

He has also supported the Leave campaign since the 2016 referendum.

After Mr Johnson was announced as the winner of the Tory leadership contest, Mr Gove tweeted: “Time for Conservatives to come together and deliver Brexit.”

And now he is Deputy Prime Minister. 

The chairman of the European Research Group (ERG) has admitted Mr Johnson has his “complete support”.

He told Sky News: “I have been supporting Boris for a long time, he has my complete support.

“If he wants me to do anything for him I will, of course, do it.

“But the key is that we deliver Brexit and do what the country needs, it is not about me.”

Former Brexit Secretary Mr Davis was the first Leave supporter to quit after Mrs May first announced her Chequers deal.

But he could be making a shock comeback as he is said to be in line for wither Chancellor or Foreign Secretary after reportedly telling Mr Johnson he would not accept a lower role.

The staunch Brexiteer and former junior Brexit minister under Theresa May has been a vocal supporter for Mr Johnson since he decided he would not stand for the role of PM himself. 

Yesterday he took to social media himself to congratulate Mr Johnson, adding: “The campaign is over. Now the hard work begins.” 

Home Secretary Said Javid was said to be frontrunner for the top treasury job.

But insiders at the Telegraph say he has not “done enough” to support Mr Johnson’s campaign, particularly as a remainer.

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