Boris Johnson Cabinet: New PM appoints THREE chancellors – what is the difference?

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BORIS JOHNSON has appointed his new Cabinet and there are three chancellor roles: Chancellor of the Exchequer, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Lord Chancellor. So what’s the difference?

CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER

CHANCELLOR OF THE DUCHY OF LANCASTER

LORD CHANCELLOR

Boris Johnson’s top team met at the oval table for the first time on Thursday. The new Prime Minister told his Cabinet they had a “momentous task ahead” in delivering Brexit by October 31. To this end, he has surrounded himself with pro-Brexit figures in the key roles. But what do the three chancellors do?

CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER

Said Javid has taken over from Philip Hammond as Chancellor of the Exchequer, usually just referred to as the Chancellor.

This is the Government’s chief financial minister and has overall responsibility for the Treasury.

The Chancellor is responsible for raising revenue through taxation or borrowing and for controlling public spending and setting inflation targets.

He will present the annual Budget setting out fiscal policy, and the Spring Statement halfway through the financial year.

CHANCELLOR OF THE DUCHY OF LANCASTER

Michael Gove has taken over as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster from David Lidington.

The Duchy of Lancaster is the private estate of the British monarchy, a portfolio made up mostly of land and properties.

The primary function of the Duchy of Lancaster is to provide income to the Queen.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is responsible for administering the estates and rents of the Duchy of Lancaster, but doesn’t actually play much of a tole in the day-to-day management of the Duchy.

This role is usually held by a senior political whose actual role is quite different.

  • Advising the PM on developing and implementing government policy
  • Driving forward government business and implementation including chairing and deputy chairing Cabinet
  • Committees and implementation taskforces
  • Overseeing devolution consequences of EU exit
  • Overseeing constitutional affairs and maintaining the integrity of the Union

LORD CHANCELLOR

Robert Buckland has taken over as Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice from David Gauke.

The roles of Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary are combined, and most of the work undertaken will be for the Ministry of Justice.

The Lord Chancellor is, in fact, one of the most ancient offices of state, dating back many centuries.

The formal title, the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain technically outranks the Prime Minister, although this hasn’t had any bearing for many years.

The Lord Chancellor is a member of the Cabinet and, by law, is responsible for the efficient functioning and independence of the courts.

Previously, the Lord Chancellor acted as Speaker of the House of Lords and was head of the judiciary and the senior judge of the House of Lords.

However, under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, the Lord Chancellor ceased to fill these roles, and the Ministry of Justice roles increased.

  • Oversight of all portfolios and MoJ strategy
  • Resourcing of the MOJ department
  • EU exit and international business
  • Judicial policy including pay, pensions and diversity

CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER

CHANCELLOR OF THE DUCHY OF LANCASTER

LORD CHANCELLOR

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